Clarity & Confidence

What I know, I know. What I do not know, I do not know. I don’t believe in anything. I don’t disbelieve in anything. I am willing to look at everything. I have clarity and confidence. – Sadhguru

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Two Sides of a Coin

Old Coins from India

Lately, I feel more comfortable in my own skin. I don’t know if it’s a side effect of getting older or if I am learning to accept things the way they are. I feel more grounded and content. One of the reasons why I think I’m content is because of my awareness and wisdom about life. I am learning to look at life objectively.

I recall one of my blog posts, “Being Anonymous.” In that post, it says, “I exist, and I do not exist. I am anonymous. Knowing that I am a transient being helps me to see that I am a visitor on this planet. Most human beings on this earth do not even know that I exist! And this is okay with me. Being anonymous creates freedom in my mind and spirit.”

I have thought deeper about the fact that I exist and I do not exist. If I do not exist, then my problems to do not exist either. It is difficult to explain this concept, but I will try. It is like two sides of a coin: one side you exist and the other side you do not exist. And you need two sides to make a coin. If you can tap into the “you do not exist” side – that is where you find freedom.

If you can expand your mind – that’s great! Most of people live in their HEAD. Pema Chodron says it’s important to have a sense of spaciousness. She says, “One way to do this is to imagine that you’re breathing into a space as vast as the sky.” She continues to say in her book, Living Beautifully with Uncertainty and Change, “There’s lots of room, unlimited room, enough room to accommodate anything – misery, delight, the whole gamut of human emotions.”

We are limitless, and anything is possible. If you can turn your coin around and look at your life objectively, you will see that you are as spacious as the sky.

Namaste, world.

Buddha’s Wisdom

buddha3

The Buddha’s wisdom is knowing the right amount. It doesn’t mean knowing everything about everything, but knowing impermanence, knowing suffering, knowing selflessness. The reason we get caught up in seeing things as other than they really are is our lack of wisdom. With wisdom we know how to let go; to let go of craving, let go of clinging, let go of beliefs. We let go of the tendency to always see things in relation to a self.

What we call ‘Me’ is merely a convention; we were born without names. Then somebody gave us a name, and after being called it for a while, we start to think that a thing called ‘me and mine’ actually exists. Then we feel we have to spend our lives looking after it. The wisdom of the Buddha knows how to let go of this ‘self’ and all that pertains to it; possessions, attitudes, views, and opinions. It means letting go of the opportunity for suffering (dukkha) to arise. It means giving occasion for seeing the true nature of things.  – Ven. Pasanno